Thank you Utah!

Well, we made it home.  It was a great feeling to walk through my front door and get to sleep in my own bed again.  Too bad it’s going to be short-lived … more on that, shortly.

We wrapped up a great week in Salt Lake City.  In both our CERT Program Manager and Train-the-Trainer courses we trained over 40 people in each.  Looking ahead, these individuals will go back into their communities and develop or strengthen CERT programs that will in turn educate citizens about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and train them in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, light search and rescue, team organization, and disaster medical operations.

The people we met along the way were terrific.  Along with learning, we were able to share many laughs along the way.  In one of my earlier blogs this week, I mentioned the high level of experience this class came to the table with.  That experience led to a lot of great discussion during the week.  As is often true, much learning took place during the breaks and at lunch through the networking that took place.

This was my first trip to Utah and Salt Lake City, and based on my experience this past week, I’m really looking forward to returning.

This coming week, I’m back at FEMA’s Emergency Management Institute (EMI).   Regular readers know EMI is one location I’m always eager to return to to teach.  I hope you’ll check back throughout the week (starting Monday May 21) and see what’s taking place.

The Mormon Cricket

In the pictures that follow, you will see a replica of a “Mormon Cricket”.  We were told that back in the early 1800’s, there was an infestation of these crickets and crops were being destroyed.  Fortunately, seagulls were known to have gorged themselves on these crickets and then flew to the other side of Salt Lake where they regurgitated the crickets they had eaten, and then flew back for more, and the cycle continued.  In the end, the seagulls saved the pioneers.

Then, back in 2002, the region suffered another infestation.  There supposedly were so many, when they crawled out of their holes in the ground, it looked like the ground was moving.

Hey, is that a K-State tee-shirt?

Of course, with me being from Missouri, one of the students in class felt “obligated” to give me a Jayhawk tee-shirt.  I told him I could only wear it in Utah.  Hey, wait a minute.  Do you think, maybe he didn’t like my teaching? And speaking of tee-shirts, we were provided a nice tee-shirt from the South Salt Lake City Fire Department CERT Team.

Challenge coins and pins

Both Wilson and I were presented with a couple of nice challenge coins and a couple of pins.  The challenge coins are from the Utah Department of Public Safety, Division of Homeland Security and the other is from the Carbon & Emery County region 6 Emergency Services Organization.  The pins were gifts from Weber County CERT Team and the other is from the Utah “Be Ready” campaign.

Meet the Grimm Bros.

One of the gifts we were given was a very neat little “Outdoor Skin Protection Kit” from the Grimm Brothers.  These guys were great to have in our class.  They have actually developed a nice little emergency preparedness business.  Here’s their website:  www.brothersgrimmdisasters.com

In closing, I’ll cherish these very kind gifts.  I’d like to share some closing pictures with you.

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Take care Utah!

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2 Responses to Thank you Utah!

  1. J Lee Bertoch says:

    Outstanding class, Thank you and Wilson for your time and Knowledge, We thought about giving you each chairs but Jeff would not part with those little gems. Stay safe and god speed.
    JLee Bertoch, Brothers Grimm

  2. Janalee Luke says:

    Thanks Tim. I just finished reading your entire blog about your time in Utah. Your pictures were fantastic. Glad you enjoyed your visit and thank you for sharing your knowledge and enthusiasm. I enjoyed the week-long training.
    Janalee Luke, Emery County Sheriff’s Office

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